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  1. Label qubits

    In the output of DumpMachine, it can be difficult to tell which qubit is which. It would be good if there were a function to assign a label to a qubit object, and that DumpMachine would print the label for each qubit index.

    1 vote
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  2. Error messaging for incorrect Array syntax

    Hi, I received this suggestion:
    "The Q# compiler error messages sometimes provide very little information.

    Here is a common issue I run across:
    When using Array types, I often forget the separator used in Q# is a semicolon instead of a comma.
    So I would type something like:
    AssertProb([PauliZ, PauliZ, PauliZ], qs2, Zero, 1.0, "Prob of |000> is not as expected", TOLERANCE);
    Instead of:
    AssertProb([PauliZ; PauliZ; PauliZ], qs2, Zero, 1.0, "Prob of |000> is not as expected", TOLERANCE);

    In the first case, the error message I get is the following: An expression statement must evaluate to ().
    I would find…

    2 votes
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  3. Use GPU for Quantum Calculations?

    I came across this article from about 18 months ago. I am not sure what method is being employed currently, nor if it would be applicable, but this seems like an inexpensive and novel approach:

    "The group at SINP decided to use a new Nvidia GPU designed for gaming on a personal computer. According to Kukulin, the processor is relatively inexpensive, generally costing $300 to $500.

    We reached a speed we couldn't even dream of," Kukulin said. "The program computes 260 million complex double integrals on a desktop computer within three seconds. No comparison with supercomputers! My colleague from the…

    6 votes
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    0 comments  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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